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The ingredient banned in Europe almost every U.S. woman is exposed to.





What ingredient is BANNED in Europe yet almost every girl and woman in the U.S. is exposed to daily?

Parabens!

What is all the Hype? Why is it banned in Europe? Why should you care?

parabens

Parabens are a class of preservative that are widely used in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products.
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Why stinky armpits might be good for your health.




Why stinky armpits might be good for you.

What is lurking in your deodorant?

Deodorant is such a wonderful thing! Can you imagine if we didn’t have it? Life would not be very pleasant, at least not for those around us. I personally love my deodorant. Let’s take a look at what helps us to not stink so much.

stinky armpits
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Is Our Water Poisoning Us?




Unless you’re doing something about it, YES IT IS!
poison in the water A vast array of pharmaceuticals — including antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood stabilizers and sex hormones — have been found in the drinking water supplies of at least 41 million Americans, an Associated Press investigation shows.
But the presence of so many prescription drugs, and over-the-counter in so much of our drinking water is heightening worries among scientists of long-term consequences to human health.

How do the drugs get into the water?
People take pills. Their bodies absorb some of the medication, but the rest of it passes through and is flushed down the toilet. Then, some of the water is cleansed again at drinking water treatment plants and piped to consumers
Researchers have found alarming effects on human cells and wildlife.
Just Some of the pharmaceuticals found in the water include medicines for
pain, infection, high cholesterol, asthma, epilepsy, mental illness, Anti-epileptic and anti-anxiety medications, metabolized angina medicine and the mood-stabilizing carbamazepine, sex hormones.

These have been found in Many water supplies from Southern Ca all the way to New York. Contamination is not confined to the United States. More than 100 different pharmaceuticals have been detected in lakes, rivers, reservoirs and streams throughout the world.

Perhaps it's because Americans have been taking drugs — and flushing them unmetabolized or unused — in growing amounts. Over the past five years, the number of U.S. prescriptions rose 12 percent to a record 3.7 billion.

Some drugs, including widely used cholesterol fighters, tranquilizers and anti-epileptic medications, resist modern drinking water and wastewater treatment processes. Plus, the EPA says there are no sewage treatment systems specifically engineered to remove pharmaceuticals.

One technology, reverse osmosis, removes virtually all pharmaceutical contaminants but is very expensive for large-scale use.

Something you can do at home is to add a reverse osmosis water filter for your own drinking water.
Here are a couple of my favorite options (I try to buy made in the US. That is were I live.)

APEC Water - Top Tier - Built in USA - Certified Ultra Safe, High-Flow 90 GPD Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water Filter System (RO-90)

APEC - Top Tier - Built in USA - Ultra Safe, Premium 5-Stage Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water Filter System (ROES-50)
5 Stage Home Drinking Reverse Osmosis System PLUS Extra Full Set- 4 Water Filter

Another issue: There's evidence that adding chlorine, a common process in conventional drinking water treatment plants, makes some pharmaceuticals more toxic.

Human waste isn't the only source of contamination. Cattle, for example, are given ear implants that provide a slow release of trenbolone, an anabolic steroid used by some bodybuilders, which causes cattle to bulk up. But not all the trenbolone circulating in a steer is metabolized. A German study showed 10 percent of the steroid passed right through the animals. Where does the rest go? If the public consumes this meat much of it ends up in our systems.

Ask the pharmaceutical industry whether the contamination of water supplies is a problem, and officials will tell you no (Not surprisingly). "Based on what we now know, I would say we find there's little or no risk from pharmaceuticals in the environment to human health," said microbiologist Thomas White, a consultant for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America.

But at a conference last summer, Mary Buzby — director of environmental technology for drug maker Merck & Co. Inc. — said: "
There's no doubt about it, pharmaceuticals are being detected in the environment and there is genuine concern that these compounds are getting into our water sources.”

Recent laboratory research has found that small amounts of medication have affected human embryonic kidney cells, human blood cells and human breast cancer cells. The cancer cells proliferated too quickly; the kidney cells grew too slowly; and the blood cells showed biological activity associated with inflammation.

Also, pharmaceuticals in waterways are damaging wildlife across the nation and around the globe, research shows. Notably, male fish are being feminized, creating egg yolk proteins, a process usually restricted to females.

"I think it's a shame that so much money is going into monitoring to figure out if these things are out there, and so little is being spent on human health," said Snyder.

Our bodies may shrug off a relatively big one-time dose, yet suffer from a smaller amount delivered continuously over a half century, perhaps subtly stirring allergies or nerve damage.

Many concerns about chronic low-level exposure focus on certain drug classes: chemotherapy that can act as a powerful poison; hormones that can hamper reproduction or development; medicines for depression and epilepsy that can damage the brain or change behavior; antibiotics that can allow human germs to mutate into more dangerous forms; pain relievers and blood-pressure diuretics.

For several decades, federal environmental officials and nonprofit watchdog environmental groups have focused on regulated contaminants — pesticides, lead, PCBs — which are present in higher concentrations and clearly pose a health risk. However, some experts say medications may pose a unique danger because, unlike most pollutants, they were crafted to act on the human body.

"We know we are being exposed to other people's drugs through our drinking water, and that can't be good,"
says Dr. David Carpenter, who directs the Institute for Health and the Environment of the State University of New York at Albany.
This article was found on the front page of yahoo news on – line and is not some abstract finding. Wellness is a choice that we all have to make on a daily basis. We are being besieged from all angles even if we are not aware of it. Inform yourself and fight back as best you can.

Fight on,

Dr. Craig Mortensen

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Why vampires hate garlic, and you should love it.


So I will get right down to the good stuff.
vampires and garlic
First off let me state that Garlic makes a wonderful health supplement for many people, but the so-called "garlic cure" is no substitute for the basics: sensible eating, appropriate exercise, taking your vitamins and living a healthy lifestyle.

Garlic should be seen as part of a healthy lifestyle - not as an alternative to it.

After you read why garlic is good for you I think you will be able to figure out why it keeps vampires away.

Personally I eat garlic because I like the taste; any potential health benefits are simply a bonus!

Garlic has long been touted as a health booster, but it’s never been clear why the herb might be good for you. Now new research is beginning to unlock the secrets of the odoriferous bulb.

In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that eating garlic appears to boost our natural supply of hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide is actually poisonous at high concentrations — it’s the same noxious byproduct of oil refining that smells like rotten eggs. But the body makes its own supply of the stuff, which acts as an antioxidant and transmits cellular signals that relax blood vessels and increase blood flow.

In the latest study, performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, researchers extracted juice from supermarket garlic and added small amounts to human red blood cells. The cells immediately began emitting hydrogen sulfide, the scientists found.

The power to boost hydrogen sulfide production may help explain why a garlic-rich diet appears to protect against various cancers, including breast, prostate and colon cancer, say the study authors.
Higher hydrogen sulfide might also protect the heart, according to other experts.

Although garlic has not consistently been shown to lower cholesterol levels, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine earlier this year found that injecting hydrogen sulfide into mice almost completely prevented the damage to heart muscle caused by a heart attack.

“People have known garlic was important and has health benefits for centuries,” said Dr. David W. Kraus, associate professor of environmental science and biology at the University of Alabama. “Even the Greeks would feed garlic to their athletes before they competed in the Olympic games.”

Now, the downside.

The concentration of garlic extract used in the latest study was equivalent to an adult eating about two medium-sized cloves per day. I don’t see that as a downside. Just an excuse to eat more. In such countries as Italy, Korea and China, where a garlic-rich diet seems to be protective against disease, per capita consumption is as high as eight to 12 cloves per day.

While that may sound like a lot of garlic, Dr. Kraus noted that increasing your consumption to five or more cloves a day isn’t hard if you use it every time you cook. Dr. Kraus also makes a habit of snacking on garlicky dishes like hummus with vegetables.

Many home chefs mistakenly cook garlic immediately after crushing or chopping it, added Dr. Kraus.
To maximize the health benefits, you should crush the garlic at room temperature and allow it to sit for about 15 minutes. That triggers an enzyme reaction that boosts the healthy compounds in garlic.

Garlic can cause indigestion, but for many, the bigger concern is that it can make your breath and sweat smell like…garlic.

While individual reactions to garlic vary, eating fennel seeds like those served at Indian restaurants helps to neutralize the smell.

Some of the other benefits of garlic, which is primarily due to the allicin contained in garlic. If you just can’t seem to get enough garlic in you diet, here are a couple of recommendations that I personally give to my patients.

Vitanica Professional - CandidaStat Yeast Balance Support - 120 Vegetarian Capsules
Pure Encapsulations - GarliActive 120's (Premium Packaging)
Vital Nutrients - Garlic 6000 650 mg 60 caps
Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract Liquid Vegetarian Cardiovascular 4 fl oz (120 ml)

Eating garlic or taking supplements containing high levels and good quality allicin also acts as an antibacterial. In fact, that antibacterial property works great against yeast (candida albicans) infections. Part of the reason this is so great, is that garlic (or the allicin) appears to spare the good bacteria in our bodies, leaving the good stuff to build back our immune systems once the infection is gone. Garlic also acts as a great detox or chelating agent for lead, binding to excess levels of lead in our system(no, its not just from paint chips) and excreting it.

So stock up on some GOOD QUALITY garlic and keep those vampires away while living healthier.

SO WHY DOES GARLIC KEEP VAMPIRES AWAY?

The basic premise is that garlic has been know for centuries for it's healing abilities and is also believed to be an ANTI-VIRAL. Becoming a vampire was believed to be a viral infection of the blood. So by being exposed or eating garlic it would essentially kill the virus thus killing the vampire.

Happy trails!

Dr. Craig Mortensen

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